Tag Archives: social

For Here or To Go? Social Consumption of Cannabis

In November 2016, residents in Denver, Colorado voted to pass Initiative 300, allowing businesses to seek social marijuana use permits if neighborhood or business groups also agreed and signed off. In the very near future, the process for how cannabis consumers purchase and consume cannabis will no longer be restricted to only going inside a dispensary to make your purchase and returning to a private residence to consume. Instead, it may be as simple as visiting a drive-thru and then going to a cannabis bar or social club to enjoy.

Cities such as San Francisco have had on-site consumption laws in place for some time, with notable locations including sparc, a well-known dispensary with two locations in the city, and the recently announced Power Plant Fitness, a gym slated to open in late 2017 that will allow members to consume cannabis while working out.

Social consumption of cannabis is not a new topic of discussion—just look at Amsterdam’s cannabis coffee clubs—but it is undoubtedly a legalization trend that will continue to be at the forefront as more states pass legalization or convert to adult-use markets. There remains one reoccurring theme, however: a lack of clarity on how these laws will be structured and how social consumption regulation will be put in place.

In Colorado’s state legislature, there was bipartisan agreement that the state needed to allow for venues to let patrons consume cannabis in order to deter residents and tourists alike from consuming in public places such as sidewalks and parks. A Republican-sponsored measure proposed in the state legislature would have allowed for the regulation of cannabis clubs in a similar format to how cigar bars are managed, but that legislation was put on hold for rewrite.

Within the state, there also exists a heated debate over whether or not the creation of social cannabis clubs would instigate federal intervention by the new administration, especially in light of Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ comments in opposition of the adult-use cannabis industry.

One thing is clear: since Denver’s passing of the social use ballot measure in November, there have been numerous halting attempts to put a law in place and the current law is vague. There remains much work to be done before Initiative 300 may be enacted.

For those interested in learning more or joining the discussion, the National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA) will be hosting a panel titled “For Here or To Go? Evolving Regulations on Social Consumption of Cannabis” at its 4th annual Cannabis Business Summit & Expo in Oakland, June 12-14. The panel will be led by Sam Tracy of 4Front Ventures, who supports the company’s business development and communication efforts.

You can learn more about the Summit and see the full conference agenda on the Cannabis Business Summit & Expo website. In celebration of 4/20, NCIA has extended the early bird pricing deadline for conference registration from April 21 to April 24 to allow for busy cannabis business owners and operators to take advantage of the savings.

Cannabis Industry Journal readers may use discount code CIJ15 to save 15% on registration.

Cannabusiness Sustainability

Dear Cannabusiness Community

By Olivia L. Dubreuil, Esq., Brett Giddings
2 Comments

Dear Cannabusiness Community,

You may have read our two recent articles. We received so much positive feedback that Aaron Biros (editor-in-chief of Cannabis Industry Journal) has invited us to continue with our own column at CannabisIndustryJournal.com. We are very happy to launch this column, and we thought we would take this opportunity to introduce our project, our vision and ourselves so you can understand where we are coming from when you read this series of articles.

Brett and I both have a background in business sustainability and corporate responsibility. We both have backgrounds in management consulting, with a specific expertise in sustainability issues along the supply chain. We have been working together for almost nine months now on sustainability issues in the Bay Area. In May, we started to get interested in sustainability in the cannabis industry and before we knew it we were diving deep into research relating to the environmental, social and ethical impacts of the legal cannabis industry. It was actually difficult to find a lot of information, as the reign of prohibition still very much influences what is available.cannabusiness

In June, we attended the National Cannabis Industry Association’s conference in Oakland to open up the conversation with cannabis industry players and to find out about people’s attitudes and approach to sustainability. The results were overwhelmingly positive. Not only were we encouraged to launch a project, but also excited to discover that many of the speakers presenting at the conference referenced sustainability in one way or another when they talked about environmental impact awareness, social justice, ethics or about staying competitive when “big business” enters the market.

What started out as a side project quickly became the center of focus this summer when we decided to incorporate Project Polaris, a California non-profit, to deliver sustainability knowledge and expertise to the cannabis industry.

Our thinking is as follows:

Thinking about sustainability, means thinking strategically about business. As we forge a new and upcoming industry, let’s seize the opportunity to make it a sustainability-focused one! Let’s create generally accepted industry principles that fosters a positive image of the industry and teaches newcomers about best environmental and social practices. Let’s create a voluntary and industry-led socially responsible code of conduct for cannabis business owners and suppliers, helping the regulators, as they will be drafting all of the future regulations of the legalized cannabis market. Let’s do more research on the market and the consumer. Let’s develop clean and green alternatives to dirty processes or practices. Let’s elevate the discussion and create a model industry, one where short-term, large-scale, quality-lowering corporate interests are kept at bay.

With this vision in mind, we created Project Polaris because we believe that this is a real opportunity for the industry to be a role model for other industries (and educate legislators as well as drive public opinion in those states that are still under prohibition laws). We believe there is a real economic opportunity for those businesses that understand how to embed sustainability properly within their business model. Because we know that sustainability influences legislators in a positive way because it sheds a positive light on businesses.

In the upcoming months, we will continue to research and report on sustainability-related issues facing the cannabis industry, such as packaging, edibles, “organic” in cannabis, butane extraction versus CO2 extraction and so on. We also welcome questions from our readers. If you have a question, please post it in the comments section below.

We will also take this opportunity to call out to cannabis industry organizations, cannabis businesses, or cannabis related services and product suppliers to get in touch with us if they wish to find out how to integrate sustainability more concretely into their action plan. We are not planning on doing this alone, we are seeking partners to join us on this journey, and we want to partner with you on your journey to Cannabusiness Sustainability.

PS: We still have one seat open for the board of directors and would love to hear from you if you are interested!

jazminHupp

Women & Leadership in the Cannabis Industry

By Aaron G. Biros
No Comments
jazminHupp

Launched in August of 2014, Women Grow began with the goal of establishing an organization for professional networking that supports women leaders in the cannabis industry. On a platform of fair and inclusive business practices, the organization emphasizes the importance of a social mission in business planning.

women grow event
Women Grow holds various events with thought leadership and networking opportunities

Through a variety of networking and educational events, Women Grow brings together a community of established and new industry professionals that helps connect and empower women to grow their business and succeed in the cannabis marketplace. Jazmin Hupp, CEO and co-founder of Women Grow has been referred to as a “genius entrepreneur” by Fortune Magazine and was named one of the top businesswomen in the cannabis marketplace by Forbes. “Women can be very community and healthcare-minded, providing the backbone for establishing an ethical cannabis industry with a focus on health and wellness,” says Hupp.

According to data from the U.S. Department of Labor, women make approximately 80% of all healthcare decisions for their household. Not only is Hupp’s organization helping to empower women in the workplace and in leadership roles in the industry, it also teaches good business practices. “The primary demographic purchasing cannabis in the future will be women, because they purchase 90% of OTC medicine and do 80% of household buying,” adds Hupp. “Women are the leading purchasers of alternative foods, health and wellness products, and they drink more alcohol by volume than men.” 

jazminHupp
Jazmin Hupp, CEO & co-founder of Women Grow

According to Hupp, women control the majority of consumer spending and will be looking for a safer way to recreate than consuming alcohol, and cannabis products will provide an answer. “If your target market is going to be driven by female spending, it just makes good business sense to put women in executive roles and on marketing teams,” she adds.

Because cannabis is still a schedule I narcotic in the eyes of the federal government, there are issues that involve more than just effective marketing tools. “Child Protective Services has the ability to deem a household with marijuana present unfit for children, largely due to the stigma and federal classification of cannabis,” says Hupp. “Mothers are particularly hesitant to get involved [directly in a cannabis business] because of the possibility of losing their children, hence why some mothers work on the ancillary side of the industry, as opposed to working directly with the plant.”

women grow group
Women Grow connects women leaders both new and established

Women Grow is actively working to address these needs in America’s fastest growing industry on a national scale by advocating for the end of marijuana prohibition. “This is a brand new industry that can be conscious of social, economic, and racial injustices so there are no glass ceilings for women or minorities,” Hupp says. “This comes out of a very socially conscious movement where leaders understand the benefits of inclusion, diversity, and the importance of socially responsible decisions.”

With the cannabis marketplace still in a nascent stage, opportunities to support diversity and inclusive business practices makes this industry particularly unique.